Ios lock orientation programmatically objective c

Orientation values are commonly found in image metadata, and specifying image orientation correctly can be important both for displaying the image and for certain kinds of image processing. The UIImage class automatically handles the transform necessary to present an image in the correct display orientation according to its orientation metadata, french mastiff puppies for sale in maryland an image object's image Orientation property simply indicates which transform was applied.

For example, an iOS device camera always encodes pixel data in the camera sensor's native landscape orientation, along with metadata indicating the camera orientation. UIImage rotates an image with right orientation for correct display. Language: Swift Objective-C. Enumeration UIImage. A value describing the intended display orientation for an image. SDKs iOS 2. Framework UIKit. Declaration enum Orientation : Int.

Figure 1 UIImage rotates an image with right orientation for correct display. Topics Image Orientations. See Also Image Attributes. Resizing Mode The resizing mode of the image. Resizing Mode Specifies the possible resizing modes for an image. Related Documentation.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. The dark mode beta is finally here.

Change your preferences any time. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. Before iOS 8, we used below code in conjunction with supportedInterfaceOrientations and shouldAutoRotate delegate methods to force app orientation to any particular orientation. I used below code snippet to programmatically rotate the app to desired orientation.

Firstly, I am changing the status bar orientation. And then just presenting and immediately dismissing a modal view rotates the view to desired orientation. But this is failing in iOS 8.

ios lock orientation programmatically objective c

Also, I have seen some answers in stack overflow where people suggested that we should always avoid this approach from iOS 8 onwards.

To be more specific, my application is a universal type of application. There are three controllers in total. First View controller - It should support all orientations in iPad and only portrait home button down in iPhone. Second View controller - It should support only landscape right in all conditions.

We are using navigation controller for page navigation. From the first view controller, on a button click action, we are pushing the second one on stack. So, when the second view controller arrives, irrespective of device orientation, the app should lock in landscape right only. Below is my shouldAutorotate and supportedInterfaceOrientations methods in second and third view controller.

Is there any solution for this or any better way of locking a view controller in particular orientation for iOS 8. Please help!! The problem is that if a view controller is embedded in one of these controllers the navigation or tab bar controller takes precedence and makes the decisions on autorotation and supported orientations.

I use the following 2 extensions on UINavigationController and UITabBarController so that view controllers that are embedded in one of these controllers get to make the decisions. Now you can override the supportedInterfaceOrientations method or you can override shouldAutoRotate in the view controller you want to lock down otherwise you can leave out the overrides in other view controllers that you want to inherit the default orientation behavior specified in your app's plist.

In theory this should work for all complex view controller hierarchies, but I have noticed an issue with UITabBarController. For some reason it wants to use a default orientation value. See the following blog post if you are interested in learning about how to work around some of the issues:. I found that if it's a presented view controller, you can override preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation.

PS this method dont require to override orientation functions like shouldautorotate on every viewController, just one method on AppDelegate. Check the "requires full screen" in you project general info.

First of all - this is a bad idea, in general, something wrong going with your app architecture, but, sh. Subclass UINavigationController and override the following methods:.

iOS Dev Diary

This is a feedback to comments in Sid Shah's answerregarding how to disable animations using:. If you are using navigationViewController you should create your own superclass for this and override:.

Assume that you are using storyboard. You have to create manual segue How to and in your "onClick" method:. On Xcode 8 the methods are converted to properties, so the following works with Swift :.

Possible orientations from the Apple Documentation :. The device is in portrait mode, with the device held upright and the home button on the bottom.It is important to know the difference of UIDeviceOrientation and UIInterfaceOrientation values, in order to determine what you really need in your application. Most of the time, you will need the UIInterfaceOrientation.

But sometimes, especially when dealing with legacy or old style code, or sometimes poorly designed code which you cannot easily redesign or refactor, you will need to rely on UIDeviceOrientation to determine the current orientation. An example of such poorly designed code is when you have a UIView which handles its own rotation. This is poorly designed because a UIView should not react directly to orientation changes.

This is the job of the UIViewController. Moving on, the UIDeviceOrientation is the current orientation of the device itself, not of the user interface currently displayed within the device. UIInterfaceOrientation, on the other hand, is the current orientation of the target interface. This type of case can happen when the currently displayed UIViewController does not rotate for example, only portrait is supported and then you try to rotate the device, which means that the actual device can be in landscape but the displayed UIViewController is still displayed in portrait.

Device in Landscape but UI in Portrait. This method starts the accelerometer, so when you no longer need to track the device orientation, you must call the endGeneratingDeviceOrientationNotifications method to disable the delivery of notifications as well as the accelerometer.

Also, if you want to be notified about the device orientation changes, you need to register for notifications for UIDeviceOrientationDidChangeNotification.

I thought back then that this will not affect anything, and if not more, will ensure that the accelerometer gets shut down, if it gets mistakenly activated even on an iPhone. The result of this is that after the class has been deallocated, which means that endGeneratingDeviceOrientationNotifications has been called even if beginGeneratingDeviceOrientationNotifications was not, the rotation of all the screens in the app did not work anymore.

A very tricky and not an obvious problem, so watch out for this. Note that in effect, the last retrieved UIDeviceOrientation will be processed by your code. The possile flow of execution when using this code will look like this:.

Using UIDeviceOrientation may not be the best way to get the orientation of the views, but sometimes this is still needed.

Setting device (UI) orientation programmatically?

Following this guide should help you get started, and most of the time, this is all you will need. Just be sure to read through the important points. Drop by in the comments section if this post helped. Want an app to help you track and achieve your goals, without the complex stuff, saving you from headaches?

Happy Goals has been featured in the App Store in over 32 countries. Start now, better late than never! UIDeviceOrientationUnknown. Like this: Like Loading Andrew Ash on March 28, at am. Your code for skipping faceup and facedown orientations was quite helpful. Thanks for the idea! Leave a Reply Cancel reply.

ios lock orientation programmatically objective c

Search for:. Recent Posts Error installing json 1. Happy Goals for iOS Want an app to help you track and achieve your goals, without the complex stuff, saving you from headaches?In iOS 5 we could change the device orientation programmatically like so:. But in iOS 6 setOrientation is deprecated, how may i change the device orientation programmatically in iOS 6?

I wasn't able to force the view to reorient but found that if you put slight delay before opening the UIAlertView then view has time to change orientation. I found out that the easiest way to force the device to change orientation is to present a new view controller using presentViewController:animated:completion: where the new view controller specified a particular preferred orientation by implementing the method - UIInterfaceOrientation preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation.

When a new view controller is presented, as expected, the orientation will change to the one preferred by the new view controller. So, simplest implementation best practice? The system will take care of changing the orientation for you. Obviously this might not suit all use cases, but, fortunately the same trick is applicable to force the device to change orientation for existing view controller.

ios lock orientation programmatically objective c

The trick is to present a new view controller with the specific preferred orientation that you needed, and then hide it immediately. This will cause the orientation to change temporary when the new view controller is presented. The best part is, when the new view controller is dismissed, the original presenting view controller's preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation is queried again, you can specify the final orientation you want here.

One important thing to look out here is to also temporary disable auto rotation in the original view controller when coming back from the newly presented-then-dismissed view controllerso that when user rotate their phone towards the new orientation, it does not triggered further auto rotation.

The following code should illustrate my point, my example forces rotation to portrait, just change accordingly if you want other orientation. Assuming you have the original view controller named Originaland a temporary view controller named ForcePortrait.

This does not answer how to change the device Orientation, but an additional information that might help you. Its deprecated. Just in case if you are a newbie, who just stared working in cocoa, and wondering why is your view controller messed up in iOS 6 and perfect in iOS 5, just know that shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation : is not supported anymore. Even though it may work well with Xcode 4 to 4. Apple provides a new method to get this thing done, in a much cleaner fashion. You use supportedInterfaceOrientations instead.

It returns all of the interface orientations that the view controller supports, a mask of interface orientation values. UIViewController shouldAutorotate. But I want to change the video in full Screen when I change the device orientation to landscape and back to half screen when change device orientation to Portrait. Apple made changing the device orientation programmatically in ios6 quite difficult on purpose mind you.

As far as I know the only way to accomplish what you're asking is to simulate the change of device orientation. Using setTransform to rotate the UIView and re-applying its own frame gives the desired results. Layer wont have autoresize property for iOS. One of the answer a. That is the real deal! Did you find out? Thank you very much!Is there any way to detect if an iPhone's screen is on or off? For example, when the phone's screen lock button is pressed.

I've been playing with some workarounds, like checking if screen resolution changed, checking if the orientation is unknown, or getting the brightness of the device. Nothing has panned out yet. Application will resign active gets called in all sorts of scenarios However, it seems Apple does turn off the accelerometer when the device is locked Enable iPhone accelerometer while screen is locked tested iOS4.

I know It's kind of a hack, but it has worked like a charm for me so far.

How to take a screenshot programmatically in iPhone/iOS?

Please update if you see any issues that prevent this from working. There is a prettier way of telling apart task switching and screen locking-originated applicationWillResignActive: callbacks which doesn't even involve undocumented features such as the accelerometer state. When the app is moving to the background, the app delegate is first sent an applicationWillResignActive:then an applicationDidEnterBackground:. When the app is interrupted by pressing the Lock button or by an incoming phone call, the latter method is not called.

We can use this information to distinguish between the two scenarios. Say you want to be called back in the screenLockActivated method if the screen gets locked. Here's the magic:. In case the screen gets locked, the system finishes the current runloop cycle without touching any other delegate methods.

Of course your app will have to start a UIBackgroundTask in order to get the notifications, which limits the usefulness of this technique due to the limited runtime allowed by iOS. Hope it may help you. You can use Darwin notificationsto listen for the events.

Note: according to the poster's comments to a similar question I answered here, this should work on a non-jailbroken phone, too. To use this, register for the event like this this registers for just one event, but if that doesn't work for you, try the other two :.

I believe the events I listed above get triggered when the screen is both turned on and off, locked and unlocked. You may need to track the state yourself. Update: also, the following notification is posted when the phone locks but not when it unlocks :. To use this, register for the event like this this registers for just one event, but if that doesn't work for you, try the others :. If you really want this code to run in the background as a serviceand you're jailbroken, I would recommend looking into iOS Launch Daemons.

As opposed to an app that you simply let run in the background, a launch daemon can start automatically after a reboot, and you don't have to worry about iOS rules for apps running tasks in the background. As far as I can tell, there is no documented method to determine this. Round about answer: Application will resign active gets called in all sorts of scenarios Also, com.

Let us know how this works! How to develop or migrate apps for iPhone 5 screen resolution? How to detect iPhone 5 widescreen devices?I am working on an iPad app, using autolayout, where if the user enables a certain mode "heads-up" modeI want to support only portrait or portrait upside down orientation, and furthermore, if the device is in landscape, I'd like to automatically switch to portrait mode.

Based on answers I've seen elsewhere here, the answer seems to be that I should use "application setStatusBarOrientation".

Therefore, in the method where the user has selected "heads-up" mode, I have included:. However, this simply doesn't seem to do anything. While I can physically move the device to get it to rotate into portrait, it doesn't do so automatically. In fact, when in landscape mode after running the above code to attempt to programmatically set the orientation, when I query the application "statusBarOrientation" with the following code, it remains at "4" for landscape:.

It seemed like maybe autolayout wasn't being triggered with the setStatusBarOrientation, so I attempted to add this code after, to no effect:. I realize Apple wants to leave device orientation in the hands of the user. However, I'd like to be able to support landscape mode when not in "heads-up" mode. If you have a UIViewController that should stay in Portrait mode, simply add this override and you're all set.

iOS: Using UIDeviceOrientation to Determine Orientation

The best part is there is no animation when this view is shown, it's just already in the correct orientation.

The base UINavigationController should have the below callback so that the child items can decide what orientation they want. Your VC will be asked for updated interface orientations when modal view controller is dismissed. But if you do that, your VC will autorotate if the user rotates the device How do I programmatically set device orientation in iOS7? Am I missing something to be able to force orientation change?

The only way that worked for me is presenting dummy modal view controller. This worked me perfectly Use this. Perfect solution to orientation problem.

Continue Reading. Why in iOS 8 my app at launch take wrong orientation? How to force view controller orientation in iOS 8?Before iOS 8, we used below code in conjunction with supportedInterfaceOrientations and shouldAutoRotate delegate methods to force app orientation to any particular orientation. I used below code snippet to programmatically rotate the app to desired orientation.

Firstly, I am changing the status bar orientation. And then just presenting and immediately dismissing a modal view rotates the view to desired orientation. But this is failing in iOS 8. Also, I have seen some answers in stack overflow where people suggested that we should always avoid this approach from iOS 8 onwards. To be more specific, my application is a universal type of application.

There are three controllers in total. First View controller - It should support all orientations in iPad and only portrait home button down in iPhone. Second View controller - It should support only landscape right in all conditions. Third View controller - It should support only landscape right in all conditions. We are using navigation controller for page navigation. From the first view controller, on a button click action, we are pushing the second one on stack.

So, when the second view controller arrives, irrespective of device orientation, the app should lock in landscape right only. Below is my shouldAutorotate and supportedInterfaceOrientations methods in second and third view controller. Is there any solution for this or any better way of locking a view controller in particular orientation for iOS 8. Please help!! First of all - this is a bad idea, in general, something wrong going with your app architecture, but, sh.

Note: Sometimes, device may not update from such call, so you may need to do as follow. Just call it in - viewDidAppear: of the presented view controller. I found that if it's a presented view controller, you can override preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation. I have the same problem and waste so many time for it.

So now I have my solution. My app setting is just support portrait only. However, some screens into my app need have landscape only. I fix it by have a variable isShouldRotate at AppDelegate.

And the function at AppDelegate :. And finally when a ViewControllerA need landscape state. I tried a few solutions in here and the important thing to understand is that it's the root view controller that will determine if it will rotate or not. I created the following objective-c project github. It's not perfect but it works and the same idea should work for other kind of root views such as NavigationViewController.

If you are using navigationViewController you should create your own superclass for this and override:. Assume that you are using storyboard.


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