Research portfolio example

Present the right work, summarize your findings, and communicate clearly to showcase your skills. By Lexie Kane. When we survey UX professionals about their career growthwe often hear that presenting a strong portfolio of past work is an important piece of the job-search process.

As the global user-experience community grows and matures, we expect that it will be increasingly important for job applicants to present their research skills and past work. A UX design portfolio can show the designs, from early sketches to polished screenshots. Plus, definitely, a discussion of the design thinking behind the designs. But as a researcher, you may wonder what exactly belongs in your portfolio. The work that you do is detailed and context-sensitive, so it may feel difficult to summarize for general audiences.

You may wonder which of the many deliverables produced during a research project should be included in a public portfolio. Here are 10 recommendations about how to create a UX portfolio that showcases your research skills. Take a user-centered approach to designing your portfolio. Who will view your portfolio and what information is most important to them? Begin creating your portfolio with an understanding of what people reading it will want to know.

Many of the researchers that I talk with feel pressured to create visually stunning portfolios, even if their work does not usually involve interface and graphic design. Trying to incorporate too many of the latest visual-design trends can take attention away from the content of your past projects. What people reading your portfolio really need to know is the types of research you have done, how you approach problems, and how you deliver results.

If you are searching for a new job, think about what is most important for hiring managers to know about you. Companies value hands-on experience and the ability to extract value from research. Emphasize the professional work that you have done and how you contribute to a team.

One of the most common questions that we hear about UX portfolios is how many projects to include in a portfolio. Remember that attention spans online are short.There could be many reasons why you might need to create a UX research portfolio website. It could be for a job application, building your online presence, or just to have a place where you can collect all your learnings and takeaways.

Building a UX portfolio can seem daunting to those who are new to the UX field and even those who have already had several projects in their careers. Some think building a UX researcher portfolio poses an even bigger challenge because you have fewer tangible results to showcase.

User experience researcher portfolios should be built with the same purpose in mind as other kinds of portfolios.

research portfolio example

They are supposed to showcase your skills and work experience to potential clients or employers through your past projects.

In UX it is especially important that a portfolio documents your design and research process rather than just the outputs of your work. But what is the difference between a UX researcher portfolio and a UX designer portfolio? You might also have developed your own processes and workflows. Present these in your portfolio regardless of whether you work as a researcher or a designer!

How to Structure the UX Research Portfolio Presentation - Zero to UX

A UX researcher portfolio focuses on exploring motivations and problems, as well as the effects of that exploration on design decisions. UX designer portfolios — and UI designer portfolios too, of course — contain more visual outputs wireframes, sketches, and shiny UIs while UX researcher portfolios lean towards being more content-heavy, emphasizing more of the research methods and processes.

But this can be an advantage, as it offers you more opportunities for storytelling and explaining the background of your work. A case study in a UX designer portfolio should focus on the design process and design decision. The most difficult part of creating a UX researcher portfolio or any other for that matter probably comes with starting it.

This applies to the beginner with little experience just as much as the senior with tons. Diligence and attention to detail have led you to work as a researcher, so start by making a plan.

Show the results of our work is important but explaining how we got there generates even more interest.

Example Portfolios

Introducing the reader into your thought processes and methods holds the key to building a good UX researcher portfolio. In the first chapter, we talked about the importance of creating a well-built, logical structure for your case studies. Besides a good structure, you can use some formal improvements to make it easier for readers to digest. Employers and clients really want to know how it would be to work with you. Include parts that could answer these questions.

This article has given you some useful tips on how to build a UX researcher portfolio. The main points:. List your past projects, select the most interesting ones and create an outline of the major steps you want to detail out. Once you have a skeleton, filling it in with content will come easier.The STEM research project is a student driven learning experience that will be done throughout junior and senior year.

Meaning that the student should feel like they are academically going beyond their comfort zone. This experience is supposed to push the students to develop new skills that will help them in college and in the real world. While the advisor is in place to help guide the students they should not be doing any of the work for the student.

This experience will allow the students to learn and obtain important skills:. Students will gain so many other valuable experiences through this process including independent thinking and self confidence that will be a great asset in college. There are multiple components to this STEM thesis. These components are explained in the chart below. Research Project or Experimentation. Community Service. Research Portfolio Example. Search this site. Physics Research Ideas. Journal Requirements.

Project Proposal. Quick Start Guide. Research Paper. Internship Rubric. Subpages 1 : Symposium.In a time when user experience is generally thought of design and research together, hand-in-hand, it can be difficult to portray one without the other. I ran into this problem five years back, when applying to my first UX Research role. My interviewer requested a portfolio piece to discuss for when I came to the office.

I had about 48 hours. I delivered a portfolio piece, but it was a weird mix of research and design. However, it was an internship role, and I convinced them enough to land the job. But, when those few years past and reality hit, I knew I needed to upgrade the gradient. I have narrowed them down to three:. Ah, storytelling. Everyone wants a storyteller. I must admit, the people I regard as highly intelligent both emotionally and intellectually are wonderful storytellers.

It is an extremely captivating and useful skill to have. I quickly learned, in my day-to-day job, how important storytelling is. You are able to help others understand the user and to communicate findings in an extremely human, and digestible, way. This is all well and good, until you are no longer in front of your audience, but instead, they are reading about it on a piece of paper and have about 64 more portfolios to get through by the end of day.

Each time, the delete button reigned supreme. Considering I am a fiction writer, I was frustrated. The process, and I simplified it from above, goes: inciting incident, rising action, crisis, climax, denouement, end. I tried to map user research to each of these points and ended with:. While I may end up adding a bit too much cheekiness, or detail, based off this approach, it may also be more fun to read! Hopefully, if you are struggling with putting together your UX Research portfolio, this will serve as a helpful outline or breakdown, and get you to think beyond UX.

research portfolio example

It certainly helped me look at my portfolio approach more creatively. Sign in. Storytelling for a UX research portfolio. Nikki Anderson Follow.

UX Collective Curated stories on user experience, visual, and product design. A qualitative user experience researcher who loves solving human problems and petting all the dogs. UX Collective Follow. We believe designers are thinkers as much as they are makers. See responses 3.

More From Medium. More from UX Collective.Here are 10 inspiring UX portfolios. They may not do everything right, but each of them does something very well.

Storytelling for a UX research portfolio

This is a truly beautiful piece of the internet. The site feels like a game, full of little gems of enjoyable reading, but most importantly, he communicates his design process in a comprehensive and easy to follow way.

I read this portfolio from end to end, just for pure enjoyment. Case studies are carefully mapped out from inception, through philosophy and research, to execution.

The process that Justin follows is described in depth and is backed up with great examples of imagery, giving a clear insight into the way he works. From his personal journey to his work, the communication is structured and easy to follow. Each case study is appropriately annotated and the process described, but it is the pictures that tell the story.

The site has an elegant and intuitive design, which is a pleasure to navigate. If I had to make one criticism it is that the number of case studies is a bit light. I particularly love the cute way the processes are annotated. John does a fantastic job of clearly documenting the problems, the processes and the outcomes in his portfolio. When I wrote this article the first time I felt that the only thing lacking was some sketches, which have now been added.

I was immediately endeared by the way she tells her personal story just as one would document a design process. Formerly a developer in the corporate world, our Community Manager Hawk who is a Kiwi and is actually only called Sarah by her mother said goodbye to the code and succumbed to the lure of social science. Wow- They are inspiring! Thanks for posting Hawk!

Thanks for this Hawk! I found this very helpful :. I was amazed with all the different styles. Getting personality in there is the key, because I imagine an employer going through the process of looking at a pile of portfolios needs something that sticks in the mind. Really nice roundup. Thank you for putting this together! Hey Sarah Thanks for including me on this list!Present the right work, summarize your findings, and communicate clearly to showcase your skills.

By Lexie Kane. When we survey UX professionals about their career growthwe often hear that presenting a strong portfolio of past work is an important piece of the job-search process.

28 amazing design portfolios to inspire you

As the global user-experience community grows and matures, we expect that it will be increasingly important for job applicants to present their research skills and past work.

A UX design portfolio can show the designs, from early sketches to polished screenshots. Plus, definitely, a discussion of the design thinking behind the designs.

But as a researcher, you may wonder what exactly belongs in your portfolio. The work that you do is detailed and context-sensitive, so it may feel difficult to summarize for general audiences. You may wonder which of the many deliverables produced during a research project should be included in a public portfolio. Here are 10 recommendations about how to create a UX portfolio that showcases your research skills.

Take a user-centered approach to designing your portfolio. Who will view your portfolio and what information is most important to them? Begin creating your portfolio with an understanding of what people reading it will want to know.

Many of the researchers that I talk with feel pressured to create visually stunning portfolios, even if their work does not usually involve interface and graphic design. Trying to incorporate too many of the latest visual-design trends can take attention away from the content of your past projects. What people reading your portfolio really need to know is the types of research you have done, how you approach problems, and how you deliver results.

If you are searching for a new job, think about what is most important for hiring managers to know about you. Companies value hands-on experience and the ability to extract value from research. Emphasize the professional work that you have done and how you contribute to a team.

One of the most common questions that we hear about UX portfolios is how many projects to include in a portfolio. Remember that attention spans online are short. A hiring manager, industry peer, or conference organizer may be more invested in reading than the average person browsing the internet, but you should still try to make a strong impression quickly.

Select the projects that you feel are most important or best represent the type of work that you would like to take on in the future. A common mistake in creating portfolios is to include every project that you have worked on in the past. This much information may be overwhelming to a casual reader and risks pushing important projects so far down the page that they are likely to be missed. Prioritize projects based on:. Include both artifacts that show how the study was conducted and deliverables used to communicate research findings to a large group.

We recommend including the following artifacts used to communicate research findings :. Portfolios should clearly communicate the context of the research that you have conducted. Present the project so that it tells an engaging story : why was this research effort originally started and what did you accomplish?

Clearly state your role in the project and explain which parts you were directly responsible for. Describe the team that you worked with on the project.

Your future work as a researcher will often involve collaborating with user-interface designers, developers, project managers, content teams, and many others — demonstrating that you have worked closely with a large group in the past is valuable proof that you can work well with a crossfunctional team.

Credit your colleagues by name whenever possible. Researchers should show a versatile skillset, so, if you have experience with different research methodologies e.There are plenty of awe-inspiring design portfolios out there.

To stand out amongst the reams of portfolio examples, it's important to put some real thought into your online presence. In this article, we've rounded up some of the best design portfolios around, from both studios and freelance designers.

These examples are all very different, but all stand out, whether its for clever use of animation, a quirky and memorable aesthetic, or simply a delightful user experience. When it comes to your portfolio, you don't have to be a superstar creative director or web designer; like most design jobs, a touch of creativity and innovative thinking will get you a long way.

For those that aren't super tech-savvy, our guide to the best website buildersand our favourite WordPress portfolio themes will help you on your way.

Or if you are confident building your own design portfolio, explore our roundup of the best web hosting services to make sure you're getting the best deal.

So, check out these inspiring examples of online design portfolios, which will hopefully inspire you to create your own masterpiece.

research portfolio example

Of course, the ultimate role of a design portfolio is to get more work, so don't miss our design jobs board if you're looking for a new role. Paris-based interface designer Robin Mastromarino keeps things fresh on his design portfolio site. An intriguing effect on his homepage makes the projects appear as though they're on a wheel, juddering into view with some satisfying UI animation touches. Within each case study, images also respond by warping slightly when you scroll.

Although not appropriate for every creative, given that Mastromarino specialises in UI design this strikes all the right notes. Visiting Active Theory 's portfolio website is like entering a whole new world. The design embraces a moody, Blade Runner-ish aesthetic throughout — and very successfully, too. From the mood-setting homepage animation with mouse-activated glitch effects, to the trippy About page, everything works together beautifully.

The studio keeps things clean for its project pages, with each example featuring a full-screen animation overlaid with short blurb and relevant links to further information, including detailed case studies hosted on Medium. Velvet Spectrum is the online moniker of visual artist and designer Luke Choice.

Luke has kept things simple on his homepage with a montage of uber-colourful thumbnails, which lead through to the visually arresting examples of his work displayed super-size for maximum impact. The black background keeps things clean and helps the work shine. A simple but super-effective design portfolio. This impressive design portfolio comes from Locomotivea studio based in Quebec, Canada.

With a team that specialise in crafting standout digital experiences, it makes sense that this portfolio site really shines. Playful animations bring the design to life throughout the site not just on the homepage.

It feels like effort and thought have gone into every element, from the quirky treatment of the hamburger menu to the unexpected animations on the About page.

Named after its two creative directors, Thomas Austin and Thomas Coombes, Studio Thomas is an East London studio that makes visual communication for physical and digital worlds, and its site perfectly reflects its explorative and experimental attitude.

It is a splendid example of Brutalist web design with plenty of swish touches; we particularly love the 3D wireframe model of Pamban Cafe that you can navigate with the mouse. Buzzworthy Studio describes itself as a badass digital studio in Brooklyn, and its site is one hell of a calling card, showcasing dazzling web techniques from the off. Great typography and animation combine to grab your attention, and a strong eye for aesthetics means that you'll stick around to explore all Buzzworthy's projects.

This next design portfolio isn't nearly as flashy as the examples we've explore so far, but it's still highly effective. Illustrator and artist Merijn Hoss creates beautifully detailed psychedelic works of art, but has taken an altogether more pared back and traditional approach to displaying his work on his online design portfolio.

Colourful thumbnails pop out of a clean gallery-like white background that once clicked on reveal large project images and a short description. Proof that you don't need all the bells and whistles to create a great user experience. The team offer beautifully crafted design, branding and creative direction solutions to a roster of clients predominantly in the fashion, beauty, tech and lifestyle sectors.

The projects are presented in an almost magazine-like fashion. The complete lack of information on any project is a little irritating, but RoAndCo has created a well-crafted, memorable user experience nonetheless.


thoughts on “Research portfolio example

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *